Sosh–Fantastic app for Social Skills

Sosh was developed by two practicing psychologists, Dr. Mark Bowers and Dr. Kelly Bowers, to assist children and adults with social skills strategies they can have access to “in the moment.” Sosh addresses these key areas: Relate, Relax, Recognize, Reason, and Regulate. Now for the nitty-gritty: Click on one of the five areas on the home screen.  This will take you to a screen for that skill, with four or five more options on each screen. Relate: What Did That Mean?–Idioms can be particularly confusing for people with Autism or Asperger’s.  This option allows you to search for an expression you have heard or read, to get a definition of it. First Impressions–This section allows you to add people to your contacts, indicating how you know the person, what their interests are, things you’ve talked about, and even add their pictures. Common Ground–With this option, you can enter your interests, topics you hear others discussing, and even tap on the entries to access the web for more information. Out and About–It can be hard to get out and socialize. Get Out provides a template for working out your feelings about going out. With the Explore feature, you can find nearby locations, a map of the area, and categorize the places. Talking Strategies–Here you can find a list of strategies to use in conversations, with explanations for what they are.  They include eye contact, body language, vocal tone, speech rate, speech volume, physical space, turn taking, questions vs. comments, open questions, closed questions, paraphrasing, conversation starters, and places to add specific strategies for the user.  Options within this feature include...

Lyn’s Lines-An Occupational Therapist Writes!

I really like this blog, written by an occupational therapist. I agree with her recent post about Visual Perception, and I’m looking forward to her subsequent posts on the topic. It seems to me that pushing an academic curriculum in Pre-K and K in place of gross and fine motor activities has contributed to school difficulties for far too many children.   It’s time to turn the clock back and advocate for the return of daily easel painting, block play, and puzzles!...

Book Bytes: Monstrous Book on MultiSensory Teaching

Thank you to Kathy Penn of 3DLiteracy for the heads-up on this weighty book. I just received my copy of the brand new, 786 page, 3rd edition of Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills by Judith R. Birsh.  Chapter 18 on “Learning Strategies and Study Skills” by Claire Nissenbaum and Anthony Henley is worth the price of the book all by itself!! The book is jam-packed with references, including links to many websites.  This is just one that looks like it holds oodles of useful information for parents, teachers, and students: The Learning Strategies Database from Muskigum University. If you work with students who have learning disabilities, in particular ones that are language-based, you gotta have this book!!                        ...

Apps Designed with Disability in Mind–Great Resource!

The Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence has compiled a categorized list of iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch apps.  Categories include: Communication Early Literacy Access to Reading and Writing Organization and Study Skills Reinforcement/Data Social Competence Visual Motor and Movement Accessibility Other Fun and Useful Apps Resources They also include  links to other online resources for finding apps. OCALI‘s main website looks like a treasure trove of information! They are also on Facebook. Thanks to Mobile Education Store for posting this link on...

I Do Love My iPad…But There ARE Advantages to Handwriting

Check out this story from Handwriting Without Tears.  I ‘tap’ or ‘type’ practically everything these days, it seems.  I seem to ‘think’ better when using a keyboard.  However, I DO know that writing things out by hand has helped me study for tests.  What do you think? Does the ACT of handwriting as a tool for improving memory make learning the ART of handwriting an important skill to keep...